A Beginners Guide To Training Your Dog

A Beginners Guide To Training Your Dog

It is widely acknowledged that the better trained your dog is, the higher quality of a relationship the two of you will enjoy. Well-trained and well-socialized dogs are a joy to be around, and can make pet ownership a delightful aspect of your life. So to enhance your relationship with your dog, read on!

When training your dog, try to use positive reinforcement. Instead of harshly scolding the animal when it does something wrong, reward it with a small treat when it behaves how you want it to. Soon enough, your puppy will learn to only do the behaviors that earn treats, becoming perfectly trained in no time.

Start slowly if you have an aggressive dog. A sudden change in your behavior can be seen as a challenge if your dog already considers himself to be the alpha dog in the pack. Make sure that you don’t approach with aggressive behavior or it will take a lot longer to get your dog in an accepting, learning mindset.

If your dog is big on chewing, make sure he has plenty of appropriate items to take his energy out on. The number one reason for destructive chewing is inadequate or inappropriate toys. Seek out rubber toys meant for busy mouths, particularly those you can stick sumptuous treats inside of. Your dog will spend more time chewing these, and less time on your table legs.

When training your dog to stay, take baby steps. First tell her to sit or lie down. When she has held that position for a couple of seconds, tell her to stay. If she stays longer, give her a treat. Allow her to move again, and repeat the process, rewarding her after she stays a bit longer with each repetition.

Use the bell ringing technique to teach your dog how to let you know when he has to go to the bathroom. At first, you jingle the bells when it is time to go out, and soon, the dog takes over to let you know. Dogs are attentive and intelligent, and by using this method consistently, you can expect they will make the connection and ask you to go outside by ringing the bell.

Your dog should learn that nothing in life is free. Have him work to get goodies, no matter how small. Have your pooch “sit” and wait before meals are placed on the floor, and release with a command. Have your dog “sit” and wait by the door before walks. He’ll learn patience, and he’ll learn to wait for your cue.

The diet you are feeding your dog needs to match their needs and activity level. The diet that is right for a working dog is a lot different from that of a dog that lounges around the house all day. Talk with your vet regarding what is right for your pup and don’t forget their needs will change as they age.

Many people are surprised to realize that training their dog is often far easier, far less stressful, and far less time-consuming than they had originally thought. Simple changes in our own behavior, as well as simple techniques that we implement, can result in big improvements in our dog’s behavior.